Reblog if you have a scar with a story behind it.

thefirstmissamerica:

italy-curl:

jessieboooooo:

This one time I tripped

This one time I split my forehead open

This one time a dark wizard tried to kill me when I was a infant but couldn’t

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

holiday-in-cami-bodia:

dont tell me you didnt see this coming

(via blackandyellowdoodles)

Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

This makes me laugh every time I see it.

(via tamorapierce)

(via cognitivedissonance)

analghost:

firelord obama leads the fire nation’s first strike

analghost:

firelord obama leads the fire nation’s first strike

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

I’m starting to understand the real failings of multi-cultural education growing up in K-12 schools. We gave everyone access to the “fun” parts of culture. Let’s sing the dreidel song! Now we understand the Jewish experience. Let’s talk about segregation. Wasn’t that wrong. Aren’t we glad it’s over? Let’s take turns reading parts of the “I Have a Dream” speech. We had access to the easy stuff without having to really examine the hard stuff. And we were giving easy access to things that aren’t “ours” and shouldn’t be “ours.” So you can’t just pick up the “fun” stuff and put it into your party theme or Facebook pictures. I’m using simple terms like fun because that’s how multiculturalism was given to us as children. And while it may have served a purpose at the time, it gave us too much access to claim things that aren’t ours.

I honestly, honestly think that is some of the reasons why the race parties are such a horrible fad on college campuses. They are carrying on what we did in elementary school. Let’s make culture a party! Everyone bring your cultural food and put on a costume! The racism is present and good percentage of the participants are really expressing deep rooted racism. But some truly don’t want to “understand why it’s wrong” when they are re-enacting what we used to do with culture in elementary schools. Culture was supposed to be fun. “I don’t understand why you are mad now? I thought culture was a party!” Party’s over kids. Put down the head-dress.
— Brian Henry (via theteej)

(via hellomynameismaddy)

I don’t have a solid argument here, but I gotta say that this makes me feel a little ehhhh.  Like, I’m totally pro-choice, but I prefer to think of it in a body autonomy sort of way — like you cannot be forced to give a blood transfusion or organ donation, or whatever, even if it would save someone’s life and even if you are dead.  So pregnant people should not be forced to donate their body’s resources to the fetus inside them.
However, I think I don’t like the argument pictured.  Because then what is your definition of ‘sentient’?  We see horrible violence done to non-communicative, paralyzed, ‘vegetative’ disabled people.  We see the ‘better off dead’ argument.  We even see this in regards to abortion — abortion is okay if you find out the fetus has some sort of disability, because they are even less of a person.
Also, at what point does a fetus become sentient/become a person?  Right exactly at birth?  I mean, newborns can’t do anything for themselves. They just cry and eat and poop and sleep.  It’s not really a person, so should I be allowed to kill it because I can’t take care of it?  If it’s not a person then, then it’s not murder.  Some babies are premature.  So, if sentience/personhood is bestowed upon birth, is that baby a person two weeks earlier than a baby born on their due date or later?
Anyway, I just don’t think that the personhood/non-personhood argument stands up to scrutiny, and is very close to the arguments against the rights of people with disabilities.  But I’m still not solid on why/I’m not very good at making my point.  Maybe someone smarter than me who’s thought about this could step in?  Or someone who thinks that abortion is okay because a fetus is not a person could clarify their argument?

I don’t have a solid argument here, but I gotta say that this makes me feel a little ehhhh.  Like, I’m totally pro-choice, but I prefer to think of it in a body autonomy sort of way — like you cannot be forced to give a blood transfusion or organ donation, or whatever, even if it would save someone’s life and even if you are dead.  So pregnant people should not be forced to donate their body’s resources to the fetus inside them.

However, I think I don’t like the argument pictured.  Because then what is your definition of ‘sentient’?  We see horrible violence done to non-communicative, paralyzed, ‘vegetative’ disabled people.  We see the ‘better off dead’ argument.  We even see this in regards to abortion — abortion is okay if you find out the fetus has some sort of disability, because they are even less of a person.

Also, at what point does a fetus become sentient/become a person?  Right exactly at birth?  I mean, newborns can’t do anything for themselves. They just cry and eat and poop and sleep.  It’s not really a person, so should I be allowed to kill it because I can’t take care of it?  If it’s not a person then, then it’s not murder.  Some babies are premature.  So, if sentience/personhood is bestowed upon birth, is that baby a person two weeks earlier than a baby born on their due date or later?

Anyway, I just don’t think that the personhood/non-personhood argument stands up to scrutiny, and is very close to the arguments against the rights of people with disabilities.  But I’m still not solid on why/I’m not very good at making my point.  Maybe someone smarter than me who’s thought about this could step in?  Or someone who thinks that abortion is okay because a fetus is not a person could clarify their argument?

(via a-big-guy-named-tiny)

soyeahso:

I love tumblr so much because it’s like “Here’s a serious essay on gentrification now cleanse your palate with this shirtless man.”

(via flintandpyrite)

simsgonewrong:

My game glitched out and now recognizes all zombies and furniture as being limes 

simsgonewrong:

My game glitched out and now recognizes all zombies and furniture as being limes 

Telling [people of color] they’re obsessed with racism is like telling a drowning person they’re obsessed with swimming.

Hari Kondabolu (via misandry-mermaid)

This is CRITICAL. Remember, the oppressors do NOT want to stop oppressing; they simply want you to endure it but be quiet about it AND not acknowledge how it impacts almost every choice you can make in life and how you navigate life itself. This is the core of bootstrap theory, a facet of the lie of meritocracy, as to why it is a disgusting and flawed concept.

This quote is EVERYTHING.

(via gradientlair)

Exactly.

I’m not obsessed with racism. You’re complacent in white supremacy.

(via sourcedumal)

(via cognitivedissonance)

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via shaliomar)